This course intends to provide knowledge on the theoretical principles and practical applications of psychological research methods in general and neurocognitive methods in particular. It will cover predominantly important steps of conducting quantitative research such as research questions, the design of experiments, validity, types of data, and reporting results. Various technologies for measuring brain structure and function and the limitations of these techniques will also be covered, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), event-related potentials (ERPs), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In addition, eyetracking measures and psychophysiological measures such as skin conductance response will be covered. The application of those methods will be illustrated with examples from various cognitive abilities (e.g., emotion understanding, memory). Wherever possible, the course will allow for hands-on experience with the methods (cf. tutorial). The goal for students is to be able to understand the methods covered and critically evaluate research that uses them.

Semester: WiSe 2023/24

This course intends to provide knowledge on the theoretical principles and practical applications of psychological research methods in general and neurocognitive methods in particular. It will cover predominantly important steps of conducting quantitative research such as research questions, the design of experiments, validity, types of data, and reporting results. Various technologies for measuring brain structure and function and the limitations of these techniques will also be covered, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), event-related potentials (ERPs), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In addition, eyetracking measures and psychophysiological measures such as skin conductance response will be covered. The application of those methods will be illustrated with examples from various cognitive abilities (e.g., emotion understanding, memory). Wherever possible, the course will allow for hands-on experience with the methods (cf. tutorial). The goal for students is to be able to understand the methods covered and critically evaluate research that uses them.

Semester: WiSe 2023/24
Semester: WiSe 2023/24
Semester: WiSe 2023/24
Semester: WiSe 2023/24
Semester: WiSe 2023/24
Semester: WiSe 2023/24

Python is a free, flexible, and easy-to-use programming language. It has become a very popular tool in industry and in many fields of research, including the cognitive sciences. In this course students will learn basic programming techniques in Python and the use of Python for slightly more advanced topics such as numerical data analysis. The main part of the course covers writing basic commands, manipulating numbers and text as well as reading and writing data files. The final part of the course concerns more advanced data manipulation methods in Python. Classes will be based around practical demonstrations and tasks. No previous knowledge of Python or other programming languages is assumed, as the course is aimed for complete beginners. By the end of the course students should have the necessary skills to program and run their own Python code and to manipulate, plot, and save their own data using Python.


Semester: WiSe 2023/24

In this seminar we will look into the basic characteristics of human versus machine intelligence. We will cover the following topics: (1) A brief look into the history of intelligence research on humans. (2) The history of artificial intelligence and its challenges. (3) Key breakthroughs in artificial intelligence research in the last 10 years. (4) Specific strengths and advantages of human versus artificial intelligence. (5) Designing interfaces between humans and modern AI systems. (6) Predictive scenarios for the impact of AI on humans. (7) Key ethical issues raised by advances in modern AI. Taken together, the aim is to provide a scientific grounding to the current heated debate on AI and how it will affect human future. 


Semester: WiSe 2023/24

The sense of agency, the feeling of control over our voluntary actions and their outcomes, stands as a fundamental aspect of the human experience. It represents the inherent phenomenology accompanying one of the most pivotal capacities possessed by living organisms: the ability to effect change in our environments through purposeful, goal-directed behaviour — the very essence of being an agent. Consequently, it comes as no surprise that cognitive scientists from diverse domains have dedicated substantial efforts towards unraveling the underlying cognitive and neural mechanisms that shape this intriguing phenomenon. In this seminar, (1) we will cover the classic papers that have laid the foundation for sense of agency research in experimental psychology, (2) we will discuss and critically evaluate different models and measures of the sense of agency, (3) we will go over sense of agency research involving multiple agents (joint agency and social agency), (4) and finally, we will discuss sense of agency and AI (“synthetic agency”).


Semester: WiSe 2023/24

Nearly all aspects of our lives are influenced by our social surroundings. This course examines how humans navigate and make choices in social settings. Key questions addressed include the advantages of collective decision-making, the motivations and mechanisms behind cooperation and coordination, the influence of social norms on behavior, and the (cognitive) process and development of social learning.

The course focuses on studying relevant research papers, with efforts made to invite original authors for discussions when possible.  At the end of the course, students are expected to have a solid grasp of key concepts in social decision-making and social behavior.


Semester: WiSe 2023/24

This course intends to provide knowledge on the theoretical principles and practical applications of psychological research methods in general and neurocognitive methods in particular. It will cover predominantly important steps of conducting quantitative research such as research questions, the design of experiments, validity, types of data, and reporting results. Various technologies for measuring brain structure and function and the limitations of these techniques will also be covered, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), event-related potentials (ERPs), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In addition, eyetracking measures and psychophysiological measures such as skin conductance response will be covered. The application of those methods will be illustrated with examples from various cognitive abilities (e.g., emotion understanding, memory). Wherever possible, the course will allow for hands-on experience with the methods (cf. tutorial). The goal for students is to be able to understand the methods covered and critically evaluate research that uses them.

Semester: WiSe 2022/23

The aim of this seminar is to familiarise students with some foundational issues in philosophy of cognitive science from the perspective of recent scientific advances at the intersection of deep learning and cognitive science. What can deep learning contribute to cognitive science? Especially relevant topics are those related to representational formats needed for cognition, scientific explanation, scientific understanding, and empiricism.

Interested students can prepare brief presentations on the suggested papers, alone or in pairs.


Semester: WiSe 2023/24
Semester: WiSe 2023/24

Time: Mondays 10:00- 11:30

Lecturers: Prof. Dr. Felix Bermpohl, Prof. Dr. Stephan Brandt, Prof. Dr. Malek Bajbouj

Venue:  Institut für Biologie, Hannoversche Str. 27, 10115 Berlin, House 12, Lecture Hall 3 (1st floor)


The course provides basic knowledge about the neuroscience of clinical psychiatry and neurology. Students will learn the basic pathophysiology of important disorders of the brain and how the brain reacts to these challenges. Participating students will learn (a) how alterations of different cognitive systems (e.g., emotion regulation, language, reward) result in mental disorders, (b) how these alterations can be studied using neuroscience methods, (c) how this knowledge may translate into therapeutic applications.


Semester: WiSe 2023/24

The course provides an introduction to the field of Cognitive Neuroscience which is the study of the neural basis of perception, cognition, and behavior in the intact human brain. The course will cover core topics in Cognitive Neuroscience, including typical experimental paradigms and research methods.


Semester: WiSe 2023/24
Semester: WiSe 2023/24
Semester: WiSe 2023/24

General
Progress Reports including the minutes of the bi-annual meetings with your supervisors are due on 30 June and 31 January each year.

Please meet with all of your supervisors, take notes from the meeting, fill in the template, include a timeline and work schedule and hand in as a single PDF document signed by you and all supervisors.


Semester: Semesterübergreifende Kurse

This course intends to provide knowledge on the theoretical principles and practical applications of psychological research methods in general and neurocognitive methods in particular. It will cover predominantly important steps of conducting quantitative research such as research questions, the design of experiments, validity, types of data, and reporting results. Various technologies for measuring brain structure and function and the limitations of these techniques will also be covered, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), event-related potentials (ERPs), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In addition, eyetracking measures and psychophysiological measures such as skin conductance response will be covered. The application of those methods will be illustrated with examples from various cognitive abilities (e.g., emotion understanding, memory). Wherever possible, the course will allow for hands-on experience with the methods (cf. tutorial). The goal for students is to be able to understand the methods covered and critically evaluate research that uses them.

Semester: WiSe 2022/23